Counterfeit Products

An unfortunate trend occuring in the world today is counterfeiting. A CEO of a california based online pharmacy recently pleaded guilty to federal counterfeiting charges. A link to the original article will be below. A way to ensure you are not accidentally purchasing counterfeit medications is to purchase directly from your veterinarian. 

https://www.securingindustry.com/pharmaceuticals/packaging-firm-ceo-pleads-guilty-to-veterinary-med-counterfeiting/s40/a3912/#.WSXiPWjyuUm

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A Tribute

Today, at the Royal Oaks Veterinary Hospital would like to take a moment to remember the pets whom we have lost this week. We consider ourselves honored to have been apart of your lives, Ty, Noel, & Blaze for all these many years. And to those we only got to know for a short time, Diesel, Lippy, & Phoebe, we will miss you as well and are so glad we were fortunate enough to know you for the time we had. Our hearts are with all the families hurting and offer our deepest sympathies. 

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Annual Blood work

Blood work for our pets is an important part of annual care. Having a baseline blood panel includes a complete blood count which checks the blood cells to see what type and how much are present and a serum chemistry that checks your pets internal organs. Doing these panels annually can show gradual changes that may not have otherwise been noticed that may indicate the early onset of some diseases. Having a baseline blood panel done when your pet is healthy can also be useful in an emergency situation. It will allow your vet to compare values when your pet is sick versus when they are healthy. This can show what values are considered normal for your pet. Another benefit of annual blood work is that it can show how continual medication use is affecting your pet's health and can help your vet determine the therapuetic value of the medication for your pet. 

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Dog Fights

Dogs can fight for many different reasons; from fear, feeling like they need to protect resources, working out pack dominance, pain & illness, and even being around an intact dog can all be causes for dog fights to break out. Once dogs have been in a fight it is important to get to the root of the reason and fully assess whether or not your family is prepared to handle the responsibilty of maintaning the delicate balance of pack life after a fight. Sometimes training and keeping dogs who have fought in the past separated can help, but it makes for a very delicate home situation. Even just leaving for a few days and having someone stay with the dogs or having them boarding seperately at a facility can upset the balance of home life. If no amicable solution can be found it may be in the dog's best interests to rehome one of them where they're the only dog. A new home should be chosen carefully to ensure it is the appropriate fit. You can also try meeting with a veterinary behavior specialist. If a dog fight occurs in your presence DO NOT PUT YOURSELF BETWEEN THE DOGS!!!!   Adrenaline is usually very high during a dog fight so they may mistakenly bite you. You can use water or loud noises to distract the dogs and lawn chairs to separate them safely. Since adrenaline is so high during these events dogs also may not feel pain so it is very important to have all dogs involved in the fight examined by a veterinarian as soon as possible after the fight. Wounds may not look as serious as they are and there is a huge risk for infection with dog bites. 

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Cardiomyopathy in Cats

Cardiomyopathy is the disease of the heart muscle. There are a few different types of cardiomyopathy; restrictive, unclassified, hypertrophic, and dilated. Some symptoms in cats include loss of appetite, lethargy, difficulty breathing/panting, and abnormal heart sounds to name a few. If your cat is experiencing one or more of these symptoms you should have your veteruinarian evaluate them. Cardiomyopathy is diagnosed by doing an electrocardiogram to examine the electrical currents in the heart muscles and by doing radiographs and echocardiographs to use images of the heart to visually identify heart enlargment or thickened walls. There can be many causes of cardiomyopathy so it is important to fully assess your pets health from head to toes using multiple diagnostic tools. 

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Abdominal Ultrasounds

When your pet is feeling ill, there are many different tests we use to help determine what is going on. Abdominal ultrasounds are a particularly handy tool because unlike traditional radiographs (X-rays) they use sound waves create an image of the internal organs and the surrounding areas. GI obstructions, bladder stones, masses or nodules. and organ abnormalities are some of the things an abdominal ultrasound can show. While ultrasounds are handy in diagnosing illness, they can also be done routinely for early detection.

 

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Memorial Day Tips for Pet Owners

With Memorial Day rapidly approaching it's important to remember some tips to help keep your weekend a safe and fun one. Everyone loves a good BBQ, especially our pets, but rich, fatty table scraps cans cause pancreatitis and diarrhea in dogs and cats. It's better to avoid treating with table scraps and treat using a species specific treats. Memorial Day often means bright, beautiful fireworks displays! If you are planning on lighting some off yourself, make sure your pets are safely confined inside. Pets are often frightened and confused by the loud displays and may try to flee. Most importantly, this Memorial Day weekend, enjoy yourselves and remember the brave men and women who have given their lives for our freedom and this country. 

 

 

 

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Rabies

Rabies is a serious, deadly disease that is found all over the world (excluding some islands) and can affect all mammals. This disease is transmitted through direct contact with infect saliva, like being bitten. Unfortunately rabies is not treatable, but with annual vaccines it is preventable. 1 and 3 years vaccines are available for dogs and cats, but the 1 year is preferable for cats. 

 

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Preparing For Emergencies: Fire

Fires can occur anytime, anywhere. Many times we are prepared and ready with a plan for ourselves, but what about our pets? There are a few ways you can prepare your pets for a fire. First and foremost, making sure your pet is microchipped and has up to date contact info on their ID Tag/Collar.  This can help your pet be returned to you if they get lost or separated from you. In case of evacuation make sure you bring your pet with you. A good rule of thumb is if it is unsafe for you, it is unsafe for your pets. If possible, you should evacuate early, rather than waiting for mandatory evacuations. Most evacuation shelters do not allow any pets outside of service pets, so if an evacuation is necessary make sure you have a safe place for your pets to go to; like a trusted friend or family member outside of your immediate area. If you're unable to find someone to house your pets during an evacuation here are a few sites to help find pet friendly lodging 

  • bringfido.com
  • dogfriendly.com
  • doginmysuitcase.com
  • pet-friendly-hotels.net
  • pets-allowed.com
  • tripswithpets.com 

It is also important to plan in case you're not home for an evacuation. If this is the case, make sure you have a trusted friend or family member who can retreive your pets and meet you in a secure location. After everything has settled down its important to keep your pet on a leash when they are not confined. Sometimes after fires familiar settings and smells may have changed and can confuse your pet. Most importantly, remain calm, things do not always go according to plan during emergencies, they can be very unpredictable. 

 

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Pancreatitis in Cats

Pancreatitis is a condition that can affect many species of animals including humans, dogs, and cats. While we know more about the causes of pancreatitis in humans and dogs, cats are harder to pinpoint the cause. It is now known that cats with pancreatitis will commonly experience loss of appetite and lethargy and sometimes vomiting. Pancreatitis in cats, if left untreated, can cause other issues such as hepatic lipidosis, diabetes mellutis, or disseminated intravascular coagulation to name a few. To diagnose pancreatitis in cats we use a specialized test to check the blood. From there we are able to treat the issues and aim to get the patient back to feeling better. 

 

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Grapes/Raisins

Grapes & raisins are a tasty treat enjoyed by people everywhere. While they may be delicious they can cause kidney failure in dogs. It is unknown why the fruit causes kidney failure, but if caught soon enough by your vet there are treatments available to prevent conditions from worsening. 

 

 

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Sago Palms

Sago Palms are a very popular species of palms here in Florida, but they pose a huge risk for our pets. The seeds of the Sago Palm are the most toxic part of the plant, but the whole plant is toxic. The most serious side effect of Sago Palm ingestion is liver failure, but it can also cause vomiting, diarrhea, lethargy, and black tarry stool which are also concerning. Its important to contact your veterinarian or pet poison control if you suspect your pet has ingested any part of a Sago Palm. 

 

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Demodex (Mange)

Demodex is one of the forms of mange our dogs can develop. Demodex are microscopic mites that cause hair loss, itching, and irritation. Demodex is not considered contagious. Pets that have this issue are genetically suseptible to getting it and should not be bred. Demodex is also more common in puppies. To test for demodex we perform a skin scrape on infected areas and look at it under the microscope where we can actually see the mites. yuck! 

 

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Antibiotic Resistance

Antibiotic resistance is when the bacterial infection in a dog or cat fights against the chosen antibiotic successfully causing it to no longer work. This can cause reoccurring infections or infections that don't ever truly go away. This issue can be avoided by giving the complete dose of antibiotics as prescribed and by making sure testing is done to ensure the proper antibiotic is chosen for that infection.  Just like in humans, MRSA, and other resistant bacterias can occur in cats & dogs so it is important to run cultures to rule them out. 

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Picky Eaters

Unlike humans, picky eating is usually more than just disliking the food presented. For our furry friends, becoming a picky eater can be an indicator that something else may be going on. When thus occurs it is important to discuss this and any other changes in behavior with your vet. That being said, over feeding table scraps to your pet can cause them to turn their noses up to mutational, healthier foods. 

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Royal Oaks Veterinary Hospital

Located at:

2105 Hartwood Marsh Road,
Suites 1 & 2
Clermont, FL 34711

Hours:

Monday - Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 6:00 p.m.
Saturday, 7:30 a.m. – 1:00 p.m.